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About The Blog Administrator

Globally connected serial entrepreneur focused on investment management, climate change, scarce resources and Fintech sectors. Business builder and Non-executive director & advisor to funds, foundations and philanthropic organizations. ...... Mr Blatt has founded and built several multi-billion dollar investment businesses and has served on the board of over 50 investment companies, trusts and funds in all of the major financial jurisdictions across the globe. Throughout his 20 plus year career, Mr Blatt has acquired expertise across all asset classes through posts in the US, Switzerland, Hong Kong and Africa. He is an innovative thinker with vision and leadership, a proven aptitude for detecting talent and is known for his strategic focus in moving companies and organizations forward in their goals.A seasoned global investment professional, he has traveled extensively to over 100 countries, has lived on 4 continents and has a keen interest in history and geopolitics and how these intersect with financial markets.

The most magnificent trees on earth

A tree is a wonderful living organism which gives shelter, food,
warmth and protection to all living things. It even gives shade to
those who wield an axe to cut it down
” – Buddha.

There are probably hundreds of majestic and magnificent trees in the world – of these, some are particularly special:

Lone Cypress in Monterey

The Lone Cypress Tree near Monterey is probably the most famous point along the 17-Mile Drive, a scenic road through Pacific Grove and Pebble Beach.

Ashdown Forest, West Sussex, England

Ashdown Forest is an ancient area of tranquil open heathland occupying the highest sandy ridge-top of the High Weald Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. It is situated some 30 miles (48 km) south of London in the county of East Sussex, England.

General Sherman, National Park in California

General Sherman is a Giant Sequoia located in the Giant Forest of Sequoia National Park in California. The famous trees of the Giant Forest are among the largest trees in the world. In fact, if measured by volume, five of the ten largest trees on the planet are located within this forest. At 11.1 meter (36.5 ft) along the base he General Sherman tree is the largest of them all. The tree is believed to be between 2,300 and 2,700 years old.

Angel Oak: Charleston, South Carolina

The Angel Oak Tree is a Southern live oak (Quercus virginiana) located in Angel Oak Park on Johns Island near Charleston, South Carolina. The Angel Oak Tree is estimated to be in excess of 400-500 years old, stands 66.5 ft (20 m) tall, measures 28 ft (8.5 m) in circumference, and produces shade that covers 17,200 square feet (1,600 m2). From tip to tip Its longest branch distance is 187 ft.

 Arbol del Tule, Mexico

Árbol del Tule, a Montezuma Cypress, is located in the town center of Santa María del Tule in the Mexican state of Oaxaca . It has the stoutest trunk of any tree in the world although the trunk is heavily buttressed, giving a higher diameter reading than q true cross-sectional of the trunk. It is so large that it was originally thought to be multiple trees, but DNA tests have proven that it is only one tree. The tree is estimated to be between 1,200 and 3,000 years old.

American Elm: Central Park, New York

american-elm-2Ulmus americana, generally known as the American elm or, less commonly, as the white elm or water elm, is a species native to eastern North America, occurring from Nova Scotia west to Alberta and Montana, and south to Florida and central Texas. The American elm is an extremely hardy tree that can withstand winter temperatures as low as −42 °C (−44 °F). Trees in areas unaffected by Dutch elm disease can live for several hundred years.

Boab Prison Tree, Australia

The Boab Prison Tree is a large hollow tree just south of Derby in Western Australia. It is reputed to have been used in the 1890s as a lockup for Indigenous Australian prisoners on their way to Derby for sentencing. In recent years a fence was erected around the tree to protect it from vandalism.

Wisteria Tree: Ashikaga Flower Park, Japan

In the Ashikaga Flower Park in Tochigi, Japan sits an incredibly gorgeous wisteria tree that’s often referred to as the most beautiful in the whole world. The largest and oldest in Japan, the tree is the main attraction at the flower park as visitors flock to see it in full bloom. Dating back to approximately 1870, the 143-year-old tree has branches that are supported by beams, which creates a a stunning flower umbrella.

750 year old sequoia: Sequoia National Park, California

750-year-old0sequoiaGiant sequoias live at high elevations, enduring cold, heavy snows, lightning strikes—and growing bulky and strong, though not so tall as coast redwoods. This individual, the President, is the second most massive tree known on Earth.

Cherry Blossom: Sakura, Tokyo

japan-cherry-blossomIn Japan they don’t celebrate Easter but springtime in Japan is when everything goes Cherry Blossom (Sakura) crazy. The cherry blossom is Japan’s unofficial national flower. It has been celebrated for many centuries and takes a very prominent position in Japanese culture. Around late March the whole nation excitedly waits for the first buds to appear on cherry trees.

Baobab trees, Madagascar

baobabBaobab trees are native to Madagascar (it’s the country’s national tree!), mainland Africa, and Australia. A cluster of “the grandest of all” baobab trees (Adansonia grandidieri) can be found in the Baobab Avenue, near Morondava, in Madagascar. The amazing baobab (Adansonia) or monkey bread tree can grow up to nearly 100 feet (30 m) tall and 35 feet (11 m) wide.

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Foster’s health care article the Washington Times published

Feel free to forward Foster’s health care article the Washington Times published. Best regards, Judy…..

Is Every American Entitled to Health Care?

More than an entitlement, care is a calling

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Illustration of the good Samaritan by Alexander Hunter
(after a traditional mosaic)/ The Washington Times

During CNN’s health care debate on Feb. 7, Sen. Bernie Sanders posed this question to Sen. Ted Cruz: “Is every American entitled to health care?” It’s a probing question, but here’s an even more penetrating one: Am I my brother’s keeper?

India is predominately a Hindu country, Myanmar: Buddhist, Israel: Jewish, Saudi Arabia: Muslim, Sweden: secular, and America is a Christian nation.

In 1944 Harry Truman said, “In this great country of ours it has been proven the fundamental unity between democracy and Christianity.”

In 1933, Democratic President Franklin Roosevelt, elected four times, said that we cannot take into account the progress we’ve made as a nation without giving due credit to the role the Bible has played in the formation of our republic. In fact, when we’ve been our best and most prosperous is when we most closely adhered to its principles.

As recently as 1954, in order to graduate from Dallas public schools, one had to pass a course in the Old Testament and the New Testament.

One of the most basic of all Christian tenets — “I no longer live, but Christ lives in me” (Galatians 2:20) — motivates all of us who have invited Him into our lives to know that, yes, “we are our brother’s keeper” (Mark 12:31).

Even before Jesus hit the scene, Jewish stories related how the “Good Samaritan” put the injured Jew onto his donkey, took him to the inn and paid his bills despite the fact that Jews and Samaritans were anything but pals.

Galatians 6:2 posits, “When we carry one another’s burdens, we fulfill the law of Christ.”

And Jesus lauded his disciples: “You fed me when I was hungry, gave me drink when I thirsted, clothed me when I was naked and visited me when I was in prison.” Whoa, wait a minute. When did we do that? they asked.

“When you did it for the least of my brethren,” Jesus replied (Matthew 25:35-38).

It’s no coincidence that hospitals have names like St. Francis, St. Joseph and St. Jude.

Sen. Sanders’ question about health care, “Is it a right?” should be asked this way: “Do you and I, Sen. Cruz, and all those listening to the debate, have a responsibility” to provide health care to not only our fellow Americans but to all our fellow human beings?”

The answer is self-evident: Christian missionaries today are at work in Syria and around the world. James Robison’s Life Outreach International’s efforts alone reach millions.

We lament the fact that our health care system costs double that of other systems in the developed world. But one reason has been — well before Obamacare — we have taken care of the uninsured, penniless illegal immigrant who gets hit by a bus.

And while we all acknowledge most costs occur as we grow older, Judeo-Christian values allow God to decide when we die rather than the panel of experts in Washington that the Affordable Care Act established.

U.S. outcomes for breast cancer and prostate cancer surpass Britain’s National Health Service some want to emulate.

Democrats should join their fellow senators, even though they are Republicans, to allow Americans to own their own policies that they can take from job to job like they do their auto and homeowners insurance. This portability would not require a different policy at a new job.

We could still have the ability to select where and who provides our care, decide which coverage we want and don’t want, and recover the lower premiums we paid earlier while still benefiting from the safety net assured by guaranteed access to emergency rooms.

Attendees at the National Prayer Breakfast and the Trump inaugural sensed a spiritual awakening. The secular world view is discredited daily and not just by the $100,000 in damage at University of California, Berkeley by black-clad masked “protesters.”

Our nation is returning to those values that have served us so well for more than 200 years. We will survive Timothy Leary’s adventure into LSD and Hugh Hefner’s mansion filled with rabbits. Donald Trump promises to “end the war on Christianity” and repeal the Johnson Amendment, which returns to pastors the same freedom of speech the rest of us enjoy.

How many presidential candidates articulated the impact Jesus has in their lives? Mike Huckabee, Rick Santorum, Ted Cruz, Bobby Jindal, Rand Paul, Rick Perry, Jeb Bush, Jim Gilmore, Marco Rubio and possibly others.

I am told 10 of the 15 of Trump Cabinet nominees are enthusiastic about Jesus’ game plan for how our society can thrive. And there’s also an evangelical named Mike Pence to throw into the mix. We are on our way back, and with us a health care system that acknowledges our Christian heritage.

Make sure you invite a friend to Bible study this week.

Click here to share your comments so others can benefit from your insights.

8c0f23b3-18ac-4736-8fd9-cb855d68f9b7.jpgGod Bless,
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Let’s all of us promote Civility.
Together We’ll Get There!

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Posted by on February 19, 2017 in Investments

 

Best quotes on Gratitude and Appreciation

  1. Smile at a stranger, and make two people happy.

  2. It’s not happiness that brings us gratitude. It’s gratitude that brings us happiness.

  3. The best way to show gratitude to God is to accept everything, even problems, with joy.

  4. Appreciation can make a day; over change a life. Your willingness to put into words is all that is necessary.

  5. Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all others.

  6. On a good day, Give thanks. On a bad day, Life is a gift.

  7. When you practice gratefulness, there is a sense of respect towards others. – Dalai Lama.

  8. We must find time to stop and thank the people who make a difference in our lives.

  9. Thank You.

  10. A thankful heart is a happy heart.

  11. Be thankful for what you have. No matter how bad you may think it is your life is someone else’s fairy tale.

  12. At the end of the day, let there be no excuses, no explanations, and no regrets.

  13. If the only prayer you said was thank you that would be enough.

  14. Appreciate everything that you have.

  15. Joy is the simplest form of gratitude.

  16. When we give cheerfully and accept gratefully. Everyone is blessed.

  17. Upon waking, let your first thought be, thankful.

  18. Joy and Happiness are born of gratitude.

  19. Start each day with a grateful heart.

  20. When you start each day with a grateful heart, light illuminates from within.

  21. When I started counting my blessings, my whole life turned around.

  22. The way to develop the best that is in a person is by appreciation and encouragement.

  23. The simplest act of saying ‘Thank You’ is a demonstration of gratitude in response to an experience that was meaningful to a person.

  24. If you don’t show appreciation to those that deserve it, they’ll learn to stop doing the things you appreciate.

  25. Never let the things you want make you forget the things you have.

  26. Feeling gratitude and not expressing it is like wrapping a present and not giving it.

  27. For one minute, walk outside stand there in silence look up at the sky and contemplate how amazing life is.

  28. There is no joy without gratitude.

  29. If all you did was just look for things to appreciate you would live a joyous, spectacular life.

  30. Give thanks for a little and you will find a lot.

  31. Take a few minutes today and just sit quietly and be thankful for all that you have.

  32. As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them.

  33. People who uplift you are the best kind of people. You don’t simply keep them. You have to treasure them.

  34. Hopeful thinking can get you out of your fear zone and into your appreciation zone.

  35. Trade your expectation to appreciation and the world changes instantly.

  36. Gratitude is one of the most medicinal emotions we can feel. It elevates our moods and fills us with joy.

  37. Never stop showing someone how much they mean to you.

  38. Silent gratitude isn’t very much use to anyone.

  39. Live your life and forget your age.

  40. Sometimes we have to lose things before we can truly appreciated them.

  41. The difference people happy people and unhappy people is their level of gratitude.

  42. There is always something to be thankful for.

  43. The vibration of gratitude attracts positive things in your life.

  44. Gratitude is the best attitude.

  45. Gratitude turn what you have in to enough.

 
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Posted by on February 11, 2017 in Investments

 

Brilliant Last Political Gems of 2016!

You gotta laugh at these, hopefully now that it’s over we can all get back to work and being friends, wishing you all a terrific New Year,

 
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Posted by on January 11, 2017 in Investments

 

What’s killing your success right now …

What’s killing your success right now is the notification center on your phone. Every app you have wants to notify you of something so that they can get your attention and monetize. Your focus is now these software companies currency. Throw the phone on your bed, shut the door and get the hell away from it. There are some long hours required to achieve your dream. You’ll need to do some deep thinking. You’ll need to become a strategist like the general of an army about to go to war. Your dream is war ….. continue reading (its an excellent article)

https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/283430
http://anric.blatt.com

 
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Posted by on November 29, 2016 in Investments

 

Happiness

 “Happiness is not something you postpone for the future; it is something you design for the present.” Jim Rohn

 
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Posted by on August 30, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

How to do email so that people respond

Over 100 billion emails are sent every day. That’s 1.1 million emails sent per second.

Personally, I receive hundreds per day — and frankly, most of them are just bad… and most are too long to read.

This blog is a look at how to send effective emails, get your message across and not waste time.

If you are an entrepreneur, mastering this simple skill can make or break your ability to raise money, land customers, attract partners and win over advisors.

Tip 1: Keep it under three lines

I don’t read emails over three lines. I just don’t. I don’t have time for it.

No email should be over three lines.

If you can’t communicate your message in the first few lines, it shouldn’t be an email – instead, the email should be a request for a phone call or meeting (see below).

Tip 2: Make the subject line a) unique, b) meaningful and c) easily searchable

The subject line is one of the (if not THE) most important parts of the email.

You’d be shocked how little people actually pay attention to it and how many people mess it up.

The subject needs to be unique and compelling — just like a headline on a news article, the subject should capture my attention, pique my interest and make me want to open your email.

The subject line should be meaningful: I should know what you want, based on the subject.

And importantly, it needs to be searchable…

Searching through emails on mobile is bad enough (a big business opportunity for the entrepreneurs out there), so I need to be able to remember unique keywords in your email subject to find it quickly. Otherwise, it’s going to get buried.

Tip 3: Use EASY-TO-READ formatting!

It sounds intuitive, but you’d be shocked by how many emails I get with font size 9. It’s impossible to read on my phone.

“Hard to read,” means “it’s not read.”

Keep your audience in mind, and assume they are going to read the email on their phones, or better yet, their smartwatches.

Keep your font size 12 (or even 14) point … and keep your font style simple, ideally sans serif. I like Arial.

Use bold, underline, and ALL CAPS for the MAIN QUESTION, IMPORTANT DATES, and other KEY DETAILS.

Use line breaks to your advantage. Spacing is key. Give important details their own lines.

Tip 4: Put your specific action request in the first line

A busy exec wants to touch an email once and take action: delete, respond or forward for action.

I want to know what you’re looking for in the first sentence.

Don’t bury the lede. Don’t give me three paragraphs of context – this can come after.

Start with the action/request, and then explain if you need to.

This can be as simple as “FYI:” or “Have time for a 10 min phone call?” or “Can you sign the attached document?”

Then, and this is REALLY IMPORTANT, be specific in your request…

Instead of saying, “Can you meet sometime next week?” say, “Can you meet Wed, Sept 10 in XYZ location between 10 a.m. and 12 p.m. PST?”

Or, you can say, “I’m available to meet at these three time windows. My EA is copied. What works?” (Then list the three windows.)

This will save you about five emails back and forth figuring out logistics and a lot of unnecessary clutter to your inbox.

Tip 5: Make the ask really, really simple – such that it’s hard for your reader to say “No”

Have your email make a single, specific, simple request:

  • Do you have time for a 5 min call this week?
  • Please review and sign this document.
  • Can you make a quick intro to XYZ person?
  • I’d love a letter of support from you. I’ve attached a draft for your review.

I should be able to reply to the email in one word (ideally Yes or No), or forward it on to the right person to reply in full.

If you ask for lengthy feedback on an idea, or are asking for a big favor, or want to set up a three-hour meeting, you’re going to dramatically decrease the probability that a busy executive responds.

Not to mention, these things shouldn’t really be done over email.

Email is not a replacement for a phone call. Keep emails very short and factual. If they are long, then schedule a call or a meeting.

In general, meeting with someone is best, calls are second best, and an email is the third option if you can’t seem to get either of the first two.

Finally — if something is truly urgent, then don’t email… call or send a text

We’ve gotten so addicted to email that sometimes we assume this is the fastest way to get someone’s attention. It’s really not.

An Opportunity for Something Better?

Email really hasn’t changed much since it came out over 45 years ago.

Platforms like Slack and a few plugins and AI assistants have been useful additions to the professional communication ecosystem, but I still think there’s an opportunity to reinvent email in a big way.

We need to rethink email from first principles. I’d love to hear your ideas.

Have an idea? Tweet at me @peterdiamandis and @efficient.

Join Me

This is the sort of conversation we explore at my 250-person executive mastermind group called Abundance 360.

The program is highly selective. If you’d like to be considered, apply here. Share this with your friends, especially if they are interested in any of the areas outlined above.

P.S. Every week I send out a “Tech Blog” like this one. If you want to sign up, go to Diamandis.com and sign up for this and Abundance Insider.

P.P.S. My dear friend Dan Sullivan and I have a podcast called Exponential Wisdom. Our conversations focus on the exponential technologies creating abundance, the human-technology collaboration, and entrepreneurship. Head here to listen and subscribe: a360.com/podcast

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Posted by on August 27, 2016 in Investments

 
 
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