RSS

FEELING BURNED OUT? THE ONE CHANGE THAT COULD FIX EVERYTHING

03 Mar

WHAT DO STEVE JOBS, BOB DYLAN, AND PLATO ALL HAVE IN COMMON? APART FROM BEING SOME OF THE MOST INFLUENTIAL PEOPLE IN HISTORY, ALL OF THEM THOUGHT OF WORK AS A GAME.

BY CHARLIE HOEHN

Within a matter of months, I quit two amazing jobs.

The first was director of special projects for Tim Ferriss, the bestselling author of The 4-Hour Workweek and The 4-Hour Body. Secondly, I was the co-founder of a profitable tech startup.

Both gigs had highly desirable qualities: I got to work on exciting projects, collaborate with talented people, and I was making good money. For a 25-year-old, I was living the dream.

But then I quit.

Whenever I had to explain why I’d left, I felt spoiled and embarrassed. I had no desire to do the work–I wasn’t interested in what I was doing anymore–and I’d burned myself out.

And yet, I still felt obligated to live up to people’s expectations. Everyone asked me what I was going to do next. And I’d panic inside because it felt like I was losing. There was this voice in my head that kept telling me how far I’d come, and now I was blowing it. I’d let everyone down. I needed to become a successful CEO or a millionaire in order for the world to accept that I was okay again.

This pressure I felt to make it was such a burden–until I realized that no level of success was ever going to be enough. I would always be chasing the world outside of me. What was the point of working so hard if it wasn’t for my own happiness? The solution became very clear: stop doing work that doesn’t matter to you.

You might roll your eyes at this. “I can’t quit my job! I have a family and bills to pay!” I understand. I didn’t quit everything I didn’t want to work on right away. I just started making a conscious effort to work on projects I actually cared about.

CHANGE HOW YOU THINK ABOUT WORK

Rather than viewing work as a stressful obligation, or a means of getting rich, my work was a game I chose to play.

I wanted my work to be a game I would willingly play. I thought back on the activities I repeatedly played throughout my life because they were fun and I was good at them:

  • Creating my own art
  • Making people laugh
  • Developing skills
  • Building with my hands

I started setting aside 20 minutes each day to play one of my games. I’d come up with a fun project that allowed me to do work I cared about …….. continue reading

http://www.fastcompany.com/3026997/dialed/feeling-burned-out-1-change-could-fix-everything

Advertisements
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on March 3, 2014 in Investments

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: